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Azul New Release of Zing Runtime for Java


Azul has announced availability of a new release of its Zing runtime for Java. Now at version 14.09, the release advances Azul's jauntily named ReadyNow! Technology, which solves the "warm-up" problem prevalent in some Java applications.

Zing 14.09 ReadyNow! provides performance optimization settings and "learned compiler decisions" (from prior application runs) to be available at application startup and restarts. This capability enables Java applications to reach their full performance profile faster (without the slowdowns associated with typical Java application Just-In-Time compilation) and also reduces variability in runtime performance and latency.

"With Zing 14.09, we are greatly extending the flexibility of the JVM and are delivering the 'holy grail' of solutions to solve Java's warm-up problem", said Scott Sellers, Azul Systems cofounder and CEO. "The new Zing release extends the benefits of ReadyNow! technology for use in a variety of latency-sensitive domains, including financial trading systems and real-time risk analytics, web-scale applications, telecommunications, and other segments requiring consistent, low-latency execution."

Zing 14.09 is also fully compatible with Java SE 8. This means that Java developers (and DevOps personnel) can now utilize the full feature set of Java SE 8 while also using Zing's ability to eliminate garbage collection pauses, its ability to utilize large in-memory datasets (without stalls or performance penalty), and consistent, predictable low-latency performance.

"Zing, Azul's advanced JVM, remains one of very few options available for customers requiring the maximum performance and consistency from a Java runtime," said John Abbott, Distinguished Analyst at 451 Research. "The new features in Zing 14.09 significantly extend the core low-latency and garbage collection capabilities that support the most demanding business applications, such as those in the financial, eCommerce, and telecommunications sectors."


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