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Free Zulu Certified Builds of OpenJDK


Java runtime solutions company Azul has released certified binaries of Zulu, its build of OpenJDK, available as free downloads from its website and other selected distribution points, including the Docker hub. Each binary distribution of Zulu is now accompanied with a certificate stating the date that the build passed all required tests in the Java Community Technology Compatibility Kit (TCK) and other rigorous testing necessary for commercial use.

The company insists that as enterprise developers accelerate their adoption of open source and their use of OpenJDK, they are faced with challenges of questionable quality, version control, and security patch levels of binary builds of OpenJDK, in addition to lack of commercial support offerings for those builds.

In response then, Azul's Zulu with certified binaries aims to address these shortcomings. Zulu is a certified, multi-platform build of OpenJDK that is compliant with the Java SE 8, 7, and 6 standards. Enterprise-level support plans are available for Zulu on Windows, Linux, and Mac, along with a 10-year lifespan for major Zulu releases.

"While the OpenJDK sources and various builds are readily available, Azul is the only company to stand behind each binary build we distribute," said Scott Sellers, Azul Systems President and CEO. "Not knowing whether a build of OpenJDK has been properly tested and incorporates the latest bug fixes and security updates is a major problem for the Java Community. We now certify every Zulu release, putting our stamp of approval that the required compliance and additional rigorous testing has been performed, giving users the confidence they need to use and deploy OpenJDK broadly." "As enterprises increasingly rely on OpenJDK in production, questions of provenance and support naturally follow," said Stephen O'Grady, Principal Analyst at RedMonk. "The certification of OpenJDK builds by Azul provides an extra level of assurance to organizations looking to leverage the open source runtime."

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