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Jelastic Now Fully Supports JRuby


The Jelastic Java server hosting platform for developers continues to expand. On the back of a refined Platform as a Service (PaaS) function at the end of last year, Jelastic now supports Java Virtual Machine-based applications written in languages including Scala, Groovy, and now the JRuby Java implementation of the Ruby language.

Jelastic chief evangelist Judah Johns puts Ruby's popularity down to its simple appearance and the complexity that it allows for multiple programming models; i.e., it is considered to be functional and object-oriented, as well as imperative and reflective. JRuby is tightly integrated with Java so that when it is embedded into a Java application, there is full two-way communication and access between the Java and Ruby code, not unlike Jython (Java + Python). JRuby also fully supports the Ruby on Rails web framework for Ruby programming, allowing web applications to be run on the Java Virtual Machine.

Speaking exclusively to Dr. Dobb's, Johns said, "Jelastic makes running JRuby applications really easy. Once you install JRuby, there are a few small steps (install RoR and Warbler, which allows you to use .war files out of Rails) to get JRuby up and running in the Jelastic cloud. Once you've done that, you are ready to create your environment within Jelastic and upload your .war file. All of that takes less than ten minutes."

"Up until now, there just wasn't really a good Java hosting solution out there. Java hosting was actually quite tedious, if not stressful. There were a few options, but they required code changes to your application before you could put it online — and once you made those changes, you were stuck. Unless you were willing to do some more code changes, your current Java host was all you had. That was then of course," said Jelastic's Johns.

"With Jelastic, the only worry that a developer has now is the functionality of the application. No more worries about code changes or lock-in. No more stressing about having to manage servers and resources. Developers can just upload, deploy, and go."


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