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Welcome To The Machine-To-Machine SDK


RTX has launched a new SDK targeting M2M (machine-to-machine) applications for ultra low power Wi-Fi module devices. The SDK boasts a "comprehensive" API and an accompanying set of demo applications, plus an embedded firmware development suite with download tools.

The SDK is specifically available for the RTX4100 small form factor self-contained Wi-Fi module, a solution recently released by RTX itself. The SDK is designed to support future products in the RTX family of modules covering local, wide, and body area wireless network connectivity technologies.

The sexy part here for developers outside of the embedded world to take note of is the product's potential to bring services to the "Internet of Things" market across a broad range of applications including home automation, industrial control, healthcare, energy conservation, smart grid, security, smart appliance, and remote product diagnostics.

NOTE: The "Internet of Things" refers to uniquely identifiable objects (things) and their virtual representations in an Internet-like structure. Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is often seen as a prerequisite for the Internet of Things. If all objects of daily life were equipped with radio tags, they could be identified and inventoried by computers.

The RTX4100 Wi-Fi Module is a very small form-factor, single stream, 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi module with an on-board low power application processor. It is targeted at systems that send infrequent data packets over a network. Typically, these connected devices place a higher priority on minimizing system cost, power consumption, and wake-up time, as opposed to data throughput.

Jesper Mailind, president and CEO of RTX commented, "As a global player in wireless technologies, our intention with this new software development toolkit is to reduce the time typically needed for developers to get their M2M applications to market. The toolkit allows our customers to focus on their own embedded applications and makes it possible for sensors, appliances, and other systems to connect directly to Internet-based cloud services."


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