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Agile Code Analysis Across ASP.NET


WhiteHat Security has updated its Sentinel Source static code analysis solution with support for analyzing source code built on Microsoft's ASP.NET platform and the .NET MVC and Entity Framework.

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NOTE: Entity Framework (EF) is an object-relational mapper that enables .NET developers to work with relational data using domain-specific objects. It eliminates the need for most of the data-access code that developers usually need to write.

This latest enhancement to Sentinel Source also allows developers using these frameworks to integrate WhiteHat's application security testing solutions across the lifecycle from testing to production-safe testing of live websites and applications via the firm's dynamic application security testing (DAST) product line.

VP of WhiteHat static code analysis division Jerry Hoff says that development teams are looking for a solution that can "fully test and continually verify" the security of applications throughout the entire development process with no disruption.

"Sentinel Source tests web applications throughout development, giving developers and security teams detailed remediation guidance to enable fixes early to address critical security issues and reduce risk, cost, and resource-strain," he said.

Integration with WhiteHat's Sentinel DAST product line and web application firewalls provides a view of vulnerabilities in already-deployed applications and allows for remediation through targeted virtual patching. Finally, Sentinel Source preserves the integrity of intellectual property by eliminating the need for source code to leave the premises, while still allowing clients to access WhiteHat's cloud-based verification services.

"Time and time again, research by WhiteHat Security and others have shown that making new code free of vulnerabilities from the ground up is the lowest cost and fastest time-to-market solution for remediation," said Stephanie Fohn, CEO of WhiteHat Security.


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