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This Week’s Developer Reading List


A list of book releases compiled by Dr. Dobb’s to keep you up-to-date on software development tools and techniques.


Android Application Development
Programming with the Google SDK

by Rick Rogers, John Lombardo, Zigurd Mednieks, and Blake Meike
Based on the Linux operating system and developed by Google and the Open Handset Alliance, Android has the potential to unite a fragmented mobile market This book introduces the Android programming environment--including the operating system and SDK--and provides working examples with thorough explanations to demonstrate Android's architectural features and APIs. This practical book provides the concepts and code you need to develop software with Android and convers writing Android applications that take advantage of any core function available in today's mobile devices; creating a complete modular application that makes use of Android's UI elements; the concepts and architecture of a feature set that includes views, maps, location-based services, persistent data storage, telephony services, and inter-process communication; and advanced topics, such as 2D and 3D graphics, debugging, and performance analysis. The book is a natural complement to the existing Android documentation provided by Google. Whether you want to develop a commercial application for mobile devices, or just want to create a mobile mashup for personal use.
http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596521479/

Agile Web Development with Rails
by by Dave Thomas and David Heinemeier Hansson, with Leon Breedt, Mike Clark, James Duncan Davidson, Justin Gehtland, and Andreas Schwarz
Rails just keeps on changing. Rails 2, released in 2008, brings hundreds of improvements, including new support for RESTful applications, new generator options, and so on. And, as importantly, we’ve all learned a lot more about writing Rails applications in the last few years. Rails is more than a set of best practices. Rails also makes it both fun and easy to turn out very cool web applications. Need Ajax support, so your web applications are highly interactive? Rails has it built in. Want an application that sends and receives e-mail? Produces and consumes web services? Supports meaningful URLs? Want to write applications with a REST-based interface (so they can interact with other RESTful applications with almost no effort on your part)? All built-in. With this book, you’ll learn how to use ActiveRecord to connect business objects and database tables. No more painful object-relational mapping. Just create your business objects and let Rails do the rest. Need to create and modify your schema? Migrations make it painless (and they’re versioned, so you can roll changes backward and forward). You’ll learn how to use the Action Pack framework to route incoming requests and render pages using easy-to-write templates and components. See how to exploit the Rails service frameworks to send emails, implement web services, and create dynamic, user-centric web-pages using built-in Javascript and Ajax support. There are extensive chapters on testing, deployment, and scaling.
http://www.pragprog.com/titles/rails3/agile-web-development-with-rails-third-edition

Ubiquitous Computing: Smart Devices, Environments and Interactions
by Stefan Poslad
Ubiquitous Computing (also commonly referred to as Pervasive Computing) describes the ways in which current technological models, based upon three base designs: smart (mobile, wireless, service) devices, smart environments (of embedded system devices) and smart interaction (between devices), relate to and support a computing vision for a greater range of computer devices, used in a greater range of (human, ICT and physical) environments and activities. The author details the rich potential of ubiquitous computing, the challenges involved in making it a reality, and the prerequisite technological infrastructure. Additionally, the book discusses the application and convergence of several current major and future computing trends. This book provides an introduction to the complex field of ubiquitous computing; describes how current technology models have varying degrees of mobility wireless connectivity and service volatility; and explores how the three core designs (smart devices, environments, and interaction) based upon current technology models can be applied to, and can evolve to, support a vision of ubiquitous computing and computing for the future.
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0470035609


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