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This Week's Multicore Reading List


A list of book releases compiled by Dr. Dobb's to keep you up-to-date on parallel programming and multicore technology.

Erlang Programming
Francesco Cesarini and Simon Thompson
Available starting in June, this book is an in-depth introduction to Erlang, a programming language ideal for any situation where concurrency, fault tolerance, and fast response is essential. Erlang is gaining widespread adoption with the advent of multicore processors and their new scalable approach to concurrency. With this guide, you'll learn how to write complex concurrent programs in Erlang, regardless of your programming background or experience. This book will help you: Understand the strengths of Erlang and why its designers included specific feature; learn the concepts behind concurrency and Erlang's way of handling it; write efficient Erlang programs while keeping code neat and readable; discover how Erlang fills the requirements for distributed systems; add simple graphical user interfaces with little effort; learn Erlang's tracing mechanisms for debugging concurrent and distributed systems; and use the built-in Mnesia database and other table storage features. You'll also find an overview of the most important libraries.
http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596518189/

Concurrent Programming with Erlang/OTP (Early Access Edition)
Martin Logan, Eric Merritt, and Richard Carlsson
For those who can't wait for their Erlang info, several chapters are available electronically for this hands-on guide (due for print publishing in October), which is perfect for readers just learning Erlang or for those who want to apply their theoretical knowledge of this powerful language. You'll delve into the Erlang language and OTP runtime by building several progressively more interesting real-world distributed applications. Once you are competent in the fundamentals of Erlang, the book takes you on a deep dive into the process of designing complex software systems in Erlang.
http://www.manning.com/logan/

Expert F#
Don Syme, Adam Granicz, and Antonio Cisternino
Expert F# is about practical programming in a language that puts the power and elegance of functional programming into the hands of .NET developers. In combination with .NET, F# achieves unrivaled levels of programmer productivity and program clarity. This books serves as the authoritative guide to F# by the designer of F#; a comprehensive reference of F# concepts, syntax, and features; and a treasury of expert F# techniques for practical, real–world programming. Drawing on many of the strengths of both OCaml and .NET, F# is a general–purpose language ideal for real–world development. F# integrates functional, imperative, and object–oriented programming styles so you can flexibly and elegantly solve programming problems, and brings .NET development alive with interactive execution. Designed to help others become experts, the book gives a thorough introduction to the F# language from quick essentials to in–depth advanced topics such as active pattern matching, aggregate data types and operators, sequence expressions, lazy values, mutable data and side–effects, generics, type augmentations, functional decomposition and code organization.
http://www.apress.com/book/view/1590598504

Parallel Programming Using C++
Edited by Gregory V. Wilson and Paul Lu (Foreword by Bjarne Stroustrup)
By hiding the architecture-specific constructs required for high performance inside platform-independent abstractions, parallel object-oriented programming systems may be able to combine the speed of massively parallel computing with the comfort of sequential programming. This book describes fifteen parallel programming systems based on C++. These systems cover the whole spectrum of parallel programming paradigms, from data parallelism through dataflow and distributed shared memory to message-passing control parallelism.
http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=3952


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