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This Week's Multicore Reading List


A list of book releases compiled by Dr. Dobb's to keep you up-to-date on parallel programming and multicore technology.

Programming Massively Parallel Processors:
A Hands-on Approach

by David Kirk and Wen-mei Hwu
Multicore processors are no longer the future of computing—they are the present day reality. A typical mass-produced CPU features multiple processor cores, while a GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) may have hundreds of cores. With the rise of multicore architectures has come the need to teach advanced programmers a new and essential skill: How to program massively parallel processors.This book shows both student and professional alike the basic concepts of parallel programming and GPU architecture. Various techniques for constructing parallel programs are explored in detail. Case studies demonstrate the development process, which begins with computational thinking and ends with effective and efficient parallel programs.
http://www.elsevierdirect.com/morgan_kaufmann/kirk/

High Performance Embedded Architectures and Compilers
5th International Conference, HiPEAC 2010, Pisa, Italy,
January 25-27, 2010, Proceedings

edited by Yale N. Patt, Pierfrancesco Foglia, Evelyn Duesterwald, Paolo Faraboschi, and Xavier Tort-Martorell
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 5th International Conference on High Performance Embedded Architectures and Compilers, HiPEAC 2010, held in Pisa, Italy, in January 2010. The 23 revised full papers presented together with the abstracts of 2 invited keynote addresses were carefully reviewed and selected from 94 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on architectural support for concurrency; compilation and runtime systems; reconfigurable and customized architectures; multicore efficiency, reliability, and power; memory organization and optimization; and programming and analysis of accelerators.
http://www.springer.com/computer+science/hardware/book/978-3-642-11514-1


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