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Gizmox Makes .NET Developers Mobile Developers


Gizmox is now previewing its Visual WebGui (VWG) Enterprise Mobile platform for .NET developers. With this product the company says it is targeting the "data-centric" mobile enterprise HTML5 ‫ ‬ cross-platform application market. Aside from its marketing spin, we can probably assume that the company is also focused on the mobile enterprise app market as a whole, whether it is ranked as data-centric or not. ‬

Gizmox's use of "cross platform" extends to iOS, Android, and every W3C browser. In something of an attempt to combat security fears thrown up by the "Bring Your Own Device" trend, the firm is positioning its technology as a means of extending custom-built client/server applications to mobile devices and tablets while retaining data/IP security and support.

"Currently there are 60 billion Microsoft-based lines of code applications within enterprises, and the Gizmox Enterprise mobile framework enables developers to write mobile accessibility and make those applications available on HTML5 devices," said Navot Peled, Gizmox CEO.

"Analysts predict that HTML5 will be adopted by more than 61% of enterprises in the next two years. This release of VWG Enterprise Mobile brings a much-needed solution for .NET developers that will let them begin building cross-platform secured-by-design HTML5 mobile apps that extend existing enterprise apps," he added.

The preview version includes a suite of tools that enable developers to start building applications now, including:

  • Visual Drag and Drop Form-based Designer
  • Point-and-Click Theme Designer
  • Designated Mobile Control Suite
  • Ajax-based communication
  • Simple data binding

Gizmox insists that its VWG Enterprise Mobile is "secure by design", with applications running on the server behind the firewall. On the client side, applications are more responsive because the user interface (UI) renders on the device browser using meta-data command-level communication for the lowest web protocol available today — 10% of the bandwidth used traditionally by the Web.


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