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Microsoft, Nokia Team Up on Mobile Software



In the first partnership of its kind, Microsoft and Nokia have announced the two companies are teaming up to deliver Microsoft software to Nokia's mobile platform. Initially the partnership will focus on Microsoft Office software, but Stephen Elop, president of Microsoft Business Division, left the door open for future support, particularly in terms of communication and collaboration. According to Nokia's Kai Olstamo, the agreement will initially target Nokia's E-series devices.

At the same time, both Microsoft and Nokia stressed that the will continue in competition on other fronts. In other words, Nokia remains committed to the Symbian operating system platform, while Microsoft will continue to focus on the Windows Mobile platform.

Under the terms of the agreement, the two companies will begin collaborating immediately on the design, development, and marketing of productivity solutions.

"With more than 200 million smartphone customers globally, Nokia is the world's largest smartphone manufacturer and a natural partner for us," said Elop. "Today's announcement will enable us to expand Microsoft Office Mobile to Nokia smartphone owners worldwide and allow them to collaborate on Office documents from anywhere, as part of our strategy to provide the best productivity experience across the PC, phone and browser."

This announcement builds on the work Nokia is doing by optimizing access to e-mail and other personal information with Exchange ActiveSync. Next year, Nokia intends to start shipping Microsoft Office Communicator Mobile on its smartphones, followed by other Office applications and related software and services in the future. These will include:

  • The ability to view, edit, create and share Office documents on more devices in more places with mobile-optimized versions of Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint, Microsoft Excel and Microsoft OneNote
  • Enterprise instant messaging and presence, and optimized conferencing and collaboration experience with Microsoft Office Communicator Mobile
  • Mobile access to intranet and extranet portals built on Microsoft SharePoint Server
  • Enterprise device management with Microsoft System Center


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