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New .NET Windows Processes Development Tool


Linx is a new .NET development tool. This drag-and-drop application is used to create Windows processes, which are themselves called Linx. Essentially, this is a process designer, code generator, and scheduling service that comes with a server component for users to host and schedule processes that need to run unattended.

Still in Beta, Linx can read databases, files, or web services, transform and manipulate the data in a variety of ways, and provide that data to other programs via databases, files, or web services.

All of this functionality can be created without writing a single line of code, simply by dragging components onto a canvas and configuring these elements. Enterprises often have multiple applications for which Linx can serve as an integration tool.

Franz Rodenacker, user experience designer at Digiata, makers of Linx, suggests that corporates have lots of processes that fetch data, manipulate it in some way, and then make it available to the employees in applications where they can manage that data.

"So, our analysts commonly create applications for such corporates where they get data in via Linx overnight, get it into the right format and the next morning the employees open all kinds of web applications to work on the new data. However, the possible uses for this tool are vast and you could also build a variety of services or complete APIs using this tool as well," he said.

Users have said that they often use Linx to mock up test scenarios for test-driven development process. Linx saves hours of writing applications to automate simple and complex tasks, and testing web services or reading and writing files is easy with Linx.

Implemented as middleware, Linx can access application APIs, databases, or files from one application and convert these into data that can be used by another application. As a lean development tool, Linx allows anyone to create applications without having much programming experience. Components allow for developing processes with technically complex tasks and multiple steps.


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