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Parallels Supports Docker Apps


Parallels has updated its containers-based virtualization product, Parallels Cloud Server, to introduce native support for Docker application deployment. Service providers can deliver container-based virtual private servers to the growing number of developers building Docker applications.

Parallels Cloud Server will offer a secure and high-density virtual server environment that equips service providers to compete with large public cloud providers on price and performance in this rapidly emerging market.

"Service providers want to meet the needs of customers and customers want to run Docker applications," said James Bottomley, chief technology officer, virtualization, Parallels.

"A challenge customers face today is running Docker images in a virtualized environment based on a hypervisor. This takes a core benefit of Docker — that the applications run in containers at higher density and performance — and reduces that benefit considerably. With Parallels solution, the service provider can offer the customer an environment where Docker is running on top of Parallels Cloud Server containers-based virtual machines for optimal performance and at high-density."

For service providers and others new to containers-based virtualization, the new Docker support makes Parallels Cloud Server a compelling solution as a scalable and proven platform for expanded offerings from VPS to managed IaaS.

"The growing number of developers building Docker-based applications is a ripe market opportunity with plenty of upside that service providers should be keen to capture," said Philbert Shih, managing director, Structure Research. "But in a highly competitive market, the challenge will be how to attract customers while maintaining aggressive yet profitable price points. The answer lies in building an optimized infrastructure environment that is dense and scales, while being able to maintain high levels of performance and facilitate portability of workloads."


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