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DataStax Boldly Goes To New Planet Cassandra


DataStax has released a new version of the Planet Cassandra knowledge, expertise, and education portal. This free service is designed to enable community members to deepen their knowledge, network with each other, and also to promote themselves.

Apache Cassandra is typically described as a "massively scalable" free and open-source distributed NoSQL database for managing large amounts of structured, semi-structured, and unstructured data. Cassandra is designed to scale to a very large size across many commodity servers with no single point of failure.

"The C* community's household names of tomorrow will be born at Planet Cassandra," said Matt Pfeil, vice president of customer solutions at DataStax. "We're pleased to be the custodians — finally integrating all Cassandra knowledge and the community in a single place."

"Community involvement is so important to advance any open-source technology and it has been fantastic to see the Cassandra community form and expand over the last four years,” said Jonathan Ellis, CTO and cofounder at DataStax. "One of the challenges has been centralizing all the great things that the community has been up to, so that people wanting to learn about C* have an easy destination. Planet Cassandra recognizes and fills that need."

Planet Cassandra will feature educational resources including webinars, tutorials, videos, podcasts, and stack overflow questions. There will also be free downloads of Cassandra, drivers, and related utilities plus an events listings and a calendar that make it easy to find local Cassandra meetups and share content.

"The diversity of the authors and the variety of topics in the new Planet Cassandra shows you how fast Cassandra is growing both in terms of features and user adoption," said Ed Capriolo, a DataStax MVP and Hadoop systems administrator at m6d.com. "Just as Apache Cassandra brings together many nodes to form a massively scalable distributed database, Planet Cassandra brings together content from around the Web into one massively awesome site. DataStax is going with a peer-to-peer architecture to work with its community, not a master-slave one."


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