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Java SE 8 Roadmap Now On Horizon


Seemingly making good on its promise to give Java the love and respect that most command-line centric professionals would agree is due, Oracle has announced its next plans for advancing the Java Platform Standard Edition (Java SE) with a roadmap for future Mac OS X releases and an update on Java SE 8.

As of now, the company is releasing technology previews of both Java SE 7 and Java FX 2.0 on Mac OS X, with plans to release Java SE 7 on Mac OS X for developers in Q2 2012 followed by a consumer version later in 2012. As the OpenJDK Community hosts the development of Java SE 7 on Mac OS X and JDK 8, the prototype reference implementation of Java SE 8 will need to be fully available to the community if it is to benefit from and "thrive with contributions" from individual programmers and groups alike.

The most recent addition to the OpenJDK Community is social media big gun Twitter. The company's engineers can now participate fully in OpenJDK development and say that they plan to contribute some of their internal improvements to the HotSpot Java Virtual Machine (JVM) to OpenJDK. Oracle meanwhile says it is continuing its work to merge the Oracle Java HotSpot JVM and the Oracle JRockit JVM into a converged offering that leverages the best features of each of these market-leading implementations.

As Java SE 8 comes into view, Oracle is announcing a revised roadmap for a release with "expanded scope", expected in summer 2013. Features include lambda expressions ("closures") for higher developer productivity, better leveraging of multi-core CPUs, as well as bulk data-processing enhancements to the Java collections APIs.

"A Java-native module system ("Project Jigsaw") which will simplify the construction, packaging, and deployment of applications, and also enable a fully modular Java platform which allows customized deployments on servers, clients, and embedded systems," said Adam Messinger, vice president of development, Oracle Fusion Middleware. "It's an exciting time in Java development and we'll continue to move Java forward with updates like the Mac OS X port and our plans for Java SE 8."


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