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New Tech Partnership Boosts Counter-Insurgency (COIN) Operations


Intelligence and investigation software company i2 and geospatial analysis specialist Esri have entered into a new partnership agreement to provide defense, national security, and law enforcement agencies with new powers to undertake current and future counter-insurgency (COIN) operations.

As i2 now becomes one of Esri’s Gold Tier partners, the company is able to preview the first module of the i2 Analyst’s Notebook — Esri Edition, a piece of geospatial, link, and temporal analysis software that includes military, intelligence, law enforcement, and civilian applications.

In conjunction with this announcement, i2 has said that it is providing security analysts with the power to incorporate and visualize human demographics, road networks, railway lines, and critical pieces of civil engineering infrastructure in the hunt for terrorist cells. The new solution also includes advanced human terrain mapping capabilities to examine and to understand the dynamics of roadside bombs and Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs).

According to i2, analysts recognize the value of intelligence products that integrate and visualize geographic, temporal, and link relationships within a single comprehensive picture. The company says that using this technology, users can establish the people and locations that a suspect may be associated with, determine the routes they may have taken, and draw a buffer around a route and then query for suspicious activity, incidents, or other relevant intelligence within that buffered region.

“Geography and ‘dots on maps’ are at the core of what public safety, defense, and intelligence organizations do. But, ‘dots on maps’ are only the beginning. Through the integration of link and social network analysis capabilities with a complete GIS, public safety, defense, and intelligence agencies can now answer the other critical questions of who, what, when and why. Through one common interface, virtually every organization can accelerate its ability to become more intelligence-led and knowledge-driven,” said E.B. Chambers of Homeland Security’s Intelligence and Analysis Department.


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