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Jolt Awards: Utilities

, July 24, 2012 The Jolt judges combed through more than 40 products to find the very best developer utilities. We now reveal the Jolt Award winner and the runners-up.
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Jolt Award: Parasoft Virtualize

Your code is clean, your unit tests show green bars all the way. And then you hit the wall that is all too common in large organizations with complex applications: You need to test against a mainframe, five databases, and invoke nine services from your intranet. But these are all part of your production environment, and you have to wait weeks, or months, before you can get your app into yet another massive, integrated release. Isn't there a better way?

Parasoft's Virtualize and its Environment Manager can be your answer. Virtualize is a test tool that builds on Parasoft's 25 years of experience in automated software testing. With Virtualize, your development and test teams can create complete virtual environments for testing applications against data sources and data sinks of almost any kind. Developers can create virtual components and develop against these interfaces until the real components are available.

The secret sauce in Virtualize is that it will monitor the live traffic between your application under test and the databases, Web servers, and SOA services your app talks to. Then, Virtualize will build virtual representations of those endpoints, and allow you to replay, modify, and build on that recorded traffic so you can have complete control over the interactions between your app and the virtual endpoints. As such, the dev and test team can test 24/7 in an environment that the application cannot distinguish from the "real" one.

The possibilities are stunning. Not only can you have repeatable automated tests, but Environment Manager enables testers to define and assign different response performance profiles to each virtual endpoint. Testers can generate, modify, and run tests including setting the virtual endpoint performance (such as timing, latency, and delay) to emulate peak, expected, and slow performance.

In a group of intriguing candidates reviewed in this Utilities category, Virtualize stands out as truly Jolting product, raising the bar on automated testing and new quality achievement.

— Gary Evans






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