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Jolt Awards

The 14th Annual Software Development Jolt and Productivity Awards


HALL OF FAME

Dreamweaver
Macromedia

As someone who spent 1996-1999 as a de facto webmaster, writing HTML and JavaScript in Word files with my own macros for translating special characters and creating tables, I can attest to the power of WYSIWYG Web development. I still remember the day the new version of Microsoft Word, to my horror, began to attempt a mangled graphic representation of HTML, forcing me to take the extra step of converting all my HTML files to text in order to edit them. Then, in 1998, came Macromedia Dreamweaver, with its almost-perfect visualization of HTML. Older versions of Dreamweaver were a bit slow on the uptake, but today’s tool is not only powerful—turning scripting, GUI and site management tasks into click-driven wonders—but ubiquitous, achieving the same universality as that word-processing program we all use today. Highly usable, offering both intelligently displayed code editing and true HTML representation, Dreamweaver now supports cascading style sheets, XML, PHP, ASP.NET, ColdFusion and Java Server Pages. For its clearly dominating presence, Software Development inducts Macromedia Dreamweaver into the Jolt Hall of Fame.

—Alexandra Weber Morales


Dreamweaver Team. Top Row: David George, Sr. Principal Software Engineer; Mike Sundermeyer, Sr. VP of Product Design; Jorge Taylor, Director of Engineering; Narciso Jaramillo, User Experience Architect. Middle Row: Sho Kuwamoto, VP of Product Development; Jay London, Sr. Manager of Engineering; Heidi Bauer-Williams, Manager of Engineering. Seated: Venu Venugopal, Sr. VP of Engineering; Kevin Lynch, Chief Software Architect and General Manager (and Juggler)


The Jolt Hall of Fame


Eight outstanding products or companies have been inducted since 1996.

2003 Dreamweaver by Macromedia
2002 MSDN by Microsoft
2001 Borland
2000 Visual SlickEdit by MicroEdge
1999 O’Reilly and Associates
1998 Visio by Visio
1997 Visual Basic by Microsoft
1996 BoundsChecker by NuMega



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