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Enkive: Open Source Email Archiving


The Linux Box launched the Enkive open source email archiving and retrieval solution at the AIIM International Exposition + Conference in Philadelphia this week.

Email is an important aspect of corporate communication and increasingly is treated as an aspect of records management, thus archiving has emerged as a significant evolutionary step in the email management life cycle.

Enkive, based on open source technology, offers flexible retention management services and access control policies. Other features include a sophisticated search engine that allows full text search by sender, subject, date, text attachments and other criteria.

Enkive helps organizations address the issues of compliance with laws and regulations governing communications, as well as litigation support. This is achievable because Enkive captures email messages as they arrive or are sent to ensure they are retained before a worker can delete them in an email client. It permits recovery of email in full support of an organization's retention policies. Search and recovery of email from Enkive occurs in real-time — just a few minutes rather than days.

"Given the constantly increasing regulatory requirements and litigation companies face today, email archiving and retrieval should be in-use in companies of all sizes," said Jonathan Spira, chief analyst, Basex, a knowledge economy research firm.

Enkive also reduces storage costs by eliminating the capture of redundant messages and attachments. Its systematic approach reconstructs messages in the search and retrieval process — using the body of the message and its attachments — instead of relying on the traditional method of only checking text and metadata such as sender, dates, recipient and subject. Archived content can be encrypted (at a company's discretion) and is only accessible to authorized users.

Founded in 1999 in Ann Arbor, Michigan, The Linux Box is a software development organization specializing in open source technology and the Linux platform.


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