Channels ▼
RSS

Open Source

Free and Open Source Cloud Tools Proliferate


It has been a good week for open source cloud tools. Predictive analytics leader RapidMiner announced the introductory release of RapidMiner Cloud to make analytics more convenient as it allows users to store, manage, and deploy analytics in the cloud, with the ease of a single button. Then cloud API integration and aggregation service, Cloud Elements announced the launch of Filebrowser.io, a free, open source, cloud file browser.

Looking at the second of these two announcements, the JavaScript library connects to the leading cloud document services including Box, Dropbox, Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive. Developers can integrate the open source library into their application, allowing users to access cloud storage services without leaving the application.

Filebrowser.io connects to these services through the Cloud Elements Documents Hub API.

"In the API economy, the value of the application lies in the API services and user interfaces are a means to assist developers in building their applications faster," said Mark Geene, CEO and cofounder of Cloud Elements. "This hybrid business model is the natural evolution of what is happening with software. As the new breed of iPaaS, Cloud Elements has focused on making developers more productive in building applications that easily connect with lots of other cloud services and therefore, we will be offering all of our UIs for free and open source."

With the release of Filebrowser.io, Cloud Elements offers user interfaces for free (as open source), while only charging for the use of advanced API services. Cloud Elements insists that it is the first iPaaS (integration Platform-as-a-Service) to make its user interfaces available through open source licenses, providing developers with flexibility in tailoring the user experience within their applications.

The company believes the future of integration is enabling developers to build and deliver "Cooperative Apps", apps that connect seamlessly with other leading cloud services.

The open source code allows developers to use the UI directly in their application, saving the time and cost of custom development by streamlining the use of the Cloud Elements APIs.


Related Reading


More Insights






Currently we allow the following HTML tags in comments:

Single tags

These tags can be used alone and don't need an ending tag.

<br> Defines a single line break

<hr> Defines a horizontal line

Matching tags

These require an ending tag - e.g. <i>italic text</i>

<a> Defines an anchor

<b> Defines bold text

<big> Defines big text

<blockquote> Defines a long quotation

<caption> Defines a table caption

<cite> Defines a citation

<code> Defines computer code text

<em> Defines emphasized text

<fieldset> Defines a border around elements in a form

<h1> This is heading 1

<h2> This is heading 2

<h3> This is heading 3

<h4> This is heading 4

<h5> This is heading 5

<h6> This is heading 6

<i> Defines italic text

<p> Defines a paragraph

<pre> Defines preformatted text

<q> Defines a short quotation

<samp> Defines sample computer code text

<small> Defines small text

<span> Defines a section in a document

<s> Defines strikethrough text

<strike> Defines strikethrough text

<strong> Defines strong text

<sub> Defines subscripted text

<sup> Defines superscripted text

<u> Defines underlined text

Dr. Dobb's encourages readers to engage in spirited, healthy debate, including taking us to task. However, Dr. Dobb's moderates all comments posted to our site, and reserves the right to modify or remove any content that it determines to be derogatory, offensive, inflammatory, vulgar, irrelevant/off-topic, racist or obvious marketing or spam. Dr. Dobb's further reserves the right to disable the profile of any commenter participating in said activities.

 
Disqus Tips To upload an avatar photo, first complete your Disqus profile. | View the list of supported HTML tags you can use to style comments. | Please read our commenting policy.