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Google Announces 'Doodle 4 Google' Competition



Google is kicking off its third annual Doodle 4 Google competition that's open to K-12 students in U.S. schools who are inspired by the theme, "If I Could Do Anything, I Would . . ." A "doodle" is the logo design that appears on the Google homepage periodically to celebrate special events, holidays, or the lives of artists and inventors.

All schools in the U.S. (including private schools and homeschools) that register will have the chance to participate. Students' doodles will be judged on artistic merit, creativity, representation of the theme, and other criteria. A panel of Google employees will select the 400 State Finalists, and the Expert Jurors will select the top 40 Regional Finalists. Finally, the public will help select the four national finalists. The one National Winner will be selected by Google executives and will be announced at an event held in the Google New York office on May 26, 2010.

This year's winner will receive a:

  • $15,000 college scholarship
  • $25,000 technology grant to the champion doodler's school
  • Chance for his/her doodle to appear on the Google.com homepage on May 27, 2010
  • Laptop computer
  • Wacom digital design tablet
  • T-shirt with his/her doodle printed on it

For the first time in the competition, Google will be giving out eight (8) Extra Credit: Technology Booster awards in the form of netbook computers for schools that submit the maximum number of doodles by March 10, 2010 and have students that are selected to be a 400 State Finalist.

Only students from registered schools can enter the contest. Teachers should go to www.google.com/doodle4google to register their school by 11:59:59 P.M. Pacific Time (PT) on March 17, 2010. Parents and children interested in participating should pass this link on to their teachers. Teachers must sign up on behalf of their students and submit their students' doodles and completed entry forms by March 31, 2010 11:59:59 P.M. Pacific Time (PT).


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