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HP Enyo 2 Now Production Ready


Hewlett-Packard's Enyo 2 open-source cross-platform object-oriented JavaScript application development framework has finally left its beta stage of development and is now classed a production ready.

Stressing modularity and encapsulation as key operational characteristics, Enyo was originally conceived as a means of engendering application development for HP's Linux-based webOS platform.

According to the HP developer blog, "Back in January, we launched enyojs.com and open-sourced Enyo 1. At the same time, we released the first beta of Enyo 2. Whereas Enyo 1 had targeted webOS, Enyo 2 was rewritten from the ground up to enable truly cross-platform development, supporting mobile and desktop browsers from iOS to IE8."

Enyo 2 is now said to boast a healthy community of developers and a broad set of cross-platform UI widgets plus a layout library for building apps that works across all form factors from phones to desktops. So in fact Enyo 2 supports application development on Android, iOS, Safari, Firefox, Chrome, and Internet Explorer.

According to the Enyo blog team, new Onyx Widgets have been included with this release: "We have finished polishing a number of new UI widgets in the Onyx library, including Menu, Picker, Tooltip, Tree, Drawer, Scrim, and 'MoreToolbar', a responsive toolbar that adapts to different screen widths."

Programmers are now offered the Enyo 2 Sampler — a new app to (you guessed it) help you sample Enyo functionality and its add-on libraries, Onyx and Layout. Programmers can browse a hierarchy of interactive samples of all the UI controls, view different options for configuring them, and review source code for the samples right in the app itself.

The HP Enyo development teams says that it envisions a "web-centric future" where there aren't iOS apps, Android apps, Mac apps, and Windows apps — there are just apps. To make this vision a reality, the team is implementing a new contributor signoff process to allow them to accept larger code contributions from the community, while keeping the codebase Apache 2.0-compatible.


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