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dtSearch Expands APIs For Document Filters


Developer text retrieval software company dtSearch has announced version 7.73 of its product line with enhanced .NET, C++, and Java API options for dtSearch Engine developers. The new version works by embedding document filters for data parsing, conversion, extraction, and display of retrieved data.

Available with the present release, a new beta version of dtSearch Web with Spider provides HTML5 template enhancements for publishing instantly searchable data to an Internet or Intranet site.

So this product works as an "easy" (they mean no-programming-required) solution for instant and concurrent searching across terabytes of static and dynamic online data, with highlighted hits and dozens of other search options.

The firm's proprietary document filters support a broad range of data types. The document filters cover parsing, indexing, and searching of retrieved full-text and metadata. Support also covers display of metadata and full-text data with highlighted hits. (Typically, dtSearch does this following dtSearch's own automatic, built-in conversion of the data to HTML.) In many cases, the document filters also support integrated image display along with highlighted hits.

According to dtSearch, "The enterprise and developer products can index over a terabyte of text in a single index, spanning multiple directories, emails and attachments, online data, and other databases. The products can create and search any number of indexes. Indexed search time is typically less than a second, even across terabytes of data. The product line also supports highly concurrent, multithreaded searching for online and other shared access repositories."

The dtSearch Engine for Win & .NET and the dtSearch Engine for Linux make available dtSearch instant searching and document filters (both together with searching as well as available for separate licensing) for a wide range of Internet, Intranet, and other commercial applications. SDKs include native 64-bit and 32-bit C++, Java, and .NET (through current versions) APIs.


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