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Enea Tool Release Targets Multicore CPUs



Enea has announced availability of its Enea Optima 2.1, an Eclipse-based IDE. Optima 2.1 features enhanced system-level debugging functionality for multicore and multiprocessor application development.

Enea Optima 2.1 integrates two system-level debug tools:

  • The Enea Black Box Recorder which provides an operating system independent and portable high-performance trace and log implementation for target systems.
  • The Optima Log Analyzer provides visual presentation of the captured log information in Gantt charts, sequence charts, state charts, plots and textual views. It provides automated facilities for importing logs, collecting and refining log data, filtering and searching logs, fusing and managing multiple logs, and mapping recorded information to high-level models.

In addition to supporting embedded operating systems like OSE, Linux, and VxWorks, the Optima release extends these capabilities to DSPs by providing support for Enea OSEck, a high-performance operating system for signal processing applications.

"As the amount of software is rapidly growing in modern multicore and multi CPU embedded systems, it becomes more and more difficult to obtain the insight needed to develop, test and maintain it" said Mathias Bath, senior vice president of marketing at Enea. "To help solve this problem, our Optima Tool Suite raises the abstraction level allowing application debugging to be done at the system level, rather than individual source code lines. The results are shorter development cycles and higher quality products."

The Enea Optima tool suite is an Eclipse-based IDE targeting the Enea OSE, Enea OSEck and other real-time and embedded operating systems. Using the Eclipse platform and C/C++ development tools, Optima provides system-level browsing, debugging, profiling and analysis tools for debugging and optimization of large-scale distributed applications spanning multiple processors. All Optima plug-ins support fully distributed debugging, which enables any target CPU or DSP in a connected network to be accessed without the need for a direct connection.


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