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This Week's Multicore Reading List


A list of book releases compiled by Dr. Dobb's to keep you up-to-date on parallel programming and multicore technology.

High Speed and Large Scale Scientific Computing,
Volume 18: Advances in Parallel Computing

Edited by W. Gentzsch, L. Grandinetti and G. Joubert
During the last decade parallel technologies have completely transformed main stream computing. The majority of standard PCs today incorporate multi-processor chips, with up to four processors. This number will reach eight and more processors soon. The flexibility that parallel systems constructed with commodity components offer, make them easy to link through wide area networks, such as the Internet, to realize Grids or Clouds. The immediate benefit of these networks is that they can be accessed by a wide community of users, from many different disciplines, to solve compute intensive or data intensive problems requiring high speed computing resources. This book touches upon issues related to the new area of Cloud computing, discusses developments in Grids, Applications and Information Processing, as well as e-Science. The papers collected in this volume would be of interest to computer scientists, IT engineers and IT managers interested in the future development of Grids, Clouds and Large Scale Computing.
http://www.iospress.nl/

Symbolic Dynamics and Geometry
Using D in Graphics and Game Programming

by Brian Guenter and Sung-Hee Lee

This book explains how to use the new symbolic differentiation system D* for applications in computer games and engineering simulation. The authors describe how to create procedural 3D geometric models, link them together to form multibody physical systems, and simulate and display their physical behavior in real time. The symbolic differentiation capabilities of D* can be used in a wide variety of technical applications including computer graphics, engineering, and mechanical simulation. Many applications of D* are covered but two, real time Lagrangian physics simulation and procedural 3D geometric modeling, are developed in great detail.
http://www.akpeters.com/product.asp?ProdCode=2809

Applied Integer Programming: Modeling and Solution
by Der-San Chen, Robert G. Batson, and Yu Dang
In order to fully comprehend the algorithms associated with integer programming, it is important to understand not only how algorithms work, but also why they work. This book features a unique emphasis on this point, focusing on problem modeling and solution using commercial software. Taking an application-oriented approach, this book addresses the art and science of mathematical modeling related to the mixed integer programming (MIP) framework and discusses the algorithms and associated practices that enable those models to be solved most efficiently.Throughout the book, the authors demonstrate essential concepts through numerous examples and figures. Each new concept or algorithm is accompanied by a numerical example, and, where applicable, graphics are used to draw together diverse problems or approaches into a unified whole. In addition, features of solution approaches found in today's commercial software are identified throughout the book. It also serves as a well-organized reference for professionals, software developers, and analysts who work in the fields of applied mathematics, computer science, operations research, management science, and engineering and use integer-programming techniques to model and solve real-world optimization problems.
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0470373067.html


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