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Compuware dynaTrace 4.1 Ratchets Up APM


Compuware has this month released the dynaTrace 4.1 application performance management (APM) solution to provide full support for IBM WebSphere Message Broker, Application Servers, and Portal Servers.

With an emphasis on what Compuware is trying hard to brand as "user experience management", the new release includes support for dynaTrace advanced end-to-end transaction tracing for insight into WebSphere infrastructures during development, test, and operational stages.

"Customers across industries and around the world rely on the IBM WebSphere stack and WebSphere Message Broker to conduct tens of millions of critical business transactions a day, and now they enjoy unprecedented visibility into those transactions from the world's leading APM solution," said John Van Siclen, general manager of Compuware's APM business unit.

"The end result is significantly improved time-to-value and faster ROI for WebSphere deployments and updates. Development, test, and production costs are all slashed by reducing the time it takes to create, debug, and finalize production releases."

"Finding application performance problems within complex multi-tier web applications can be challenging, even for the most experienced," said Thomas Murphy, research director at Gartner. "Modern applications often make use of feature-rich clients running on desktops and/or devices connected to services via message-oriented middleware. While this provides a great deal of flexibility for creating information exchange between applications, it can also lead to a great deal of complexity, making it difficult to identify and diagnose the root cause of application performance issues, especially in real-time."

Compuware has engineered dynaTrace 4.1 to target the WebSphere stack or any part thereof, including WebSphere Message Broker users. WebSphere users will be able to determine if messages are flowing correctly or if messages have not been properly received by the intended recipient services and whether Message Broker is properly configured to maximize service efficiency.


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