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Is Continuous Delivery Becoming The New Normal?


The results of a "Well, they would most likely say that wouldn't they?" survey from Perforce this month suggests that Continuous Delivery is becoming the new normal. The survey included more than 600 participants across the U.S. and the U.K.

Continuous Delivery shows higher-than-anticipated adoption rates across developers working in different industries. This is being driven by consumer demand for rapid innovation and, as a software development methodology, it is already practiced by many SaaS companies.

"Constant, ongoing, business-driven change is expediting the growth of Continuous Delivery practices across multiple industry verticals," said Julie Craig, research director at Enterprise Management Associates. "Software code is being developed in smaller increments, released more often, and deployed more frequently than in the past. Some large companies deliver thousands of code changes per day, and even small companies can deliver 50 or 60 production changes daily, particularly in the online world."

So in total, 65 percent of survey respondents indicated they practice Continuous Delivery for at least some projects, with 28 percent of respondents say they practice it across all their projects.

Nearly half of respondents said they believe it has been adopted by their competitors — revealing that software developers, managers, and executives view Continuous Delivery as the new normal for software development.

"Perforce is the only versioning platform that manages all types of digital content, including hardware designs, source code, art work, test plans, test data, system environment configurations, build tools, and documentation. Version control of these assets is foundational to Continuous Delivery, making it possible for companies to confidently and compliantly automate their software development, testing, and delivery processes," said Christopher Seiwald, founder and CEO, Perforce Software.


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