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Matrix.org Reloads Inside "Illusion of Control" Vortex


Matrix.org is a newly formed group of developers whose goal is to make real-time communication over IP as seamless and interoperable as email. The group asserts that today's VoIP and IM communications are fragmented at best. It says that we all juggle multiple apps and profiles to chat, call, or video message.

"We have 'an illusion of control' because of the plethora of apps available, but in reality we are forced to jump from island to island, hoping to find our friends there, leaving our fragmented conversations and data scattered across a wide range of incompatible providers," said the group.

Matrix itself is a new open standard that allow communication services to interoperate. The end goal is that consumers will be able to choose to use their favorite app from their trusted app provider and still be able to communicate with friends using competing apps and services.

The standard has been designed to be lightweight, pragmatic, fully distributed, federated, and interoperable, and any individual or organization can set up their own Matrix server to manage their own communications, as with email. Developers will be able to create and host their own real-time communication functionality, or add such features to an existing service whilst building on the Matrix community of users. Alternatively existing communication services can also easily integrate into the Matrix ecosystem.

Matrix.org technical lead Matthew Hodgson has stated, "From today anyone can run their own Matrix server and clients, and developers can use the client API to add IM and VoIP to new or existing apps and access the wider Matrix ecosystem. It's early days, but we're really excited to see what people build as Matrix matures."

The initial inspiration and goal of the people behind Matrix.org have been to fix the problem of fragmented IP communications. But Matrix's real potential and ultimate mission is to be a new and truly open ecosystem on the Internet enabling services, devices and people to easily communicate with each other.

Matrix.org will be operated as an open initiative on a nonprofit basis. All the code has been, and will continue to be, open source.


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