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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6

Red Hat has reached version 6.6 of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. This latest version comes nearly four years after the launch of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 in 2010. It enhances system performance, administration, and virtualization functions whether operating on bare metal, building out your virtual infrastructure, or using the open hybrid cloud.

The company says that "from the kernel to the network stack" Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 has been tuned to optimize performance with support for higher processor counts and memory limits as well as kernel optimizations that allow for more efficient CPU utilization on large NUMA systems. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 also accommodates dense single-server workloads.

Other system performance enhancements include support for additional 40 GbE network adapters, reductions in network latency and jitter, and support for high performance, low latency applications.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 offers new capabilities to build and manage large, complex IT environments. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 also includes new Security Content Automation Protocol (SCAP) functionality for compliance testing and Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) for better monitoring and management in distributed environments.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 improves its functionality as a virtual guest by including several enhancements to improve the overall virtual guest experience. Support for a host to feed randomness to a virtual machine increases security for cryptographic applications while multi-queue performance improvements boost guest network and storage throughput when running Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 on a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 host.

Jim Totton, vice president and general manager, Platform Business Unit at Red Hat, said that his firm provides a reliable foundation to mission-critical systems across industries and regions. "Whether you're operating on bare metal, building out your virtual infrastructure, or leveraging the open hybrid cloud, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, with enhancements to virtualization, performance, and system administration, continues to be an excellent choice for deploying and managing large and complex IT projects."

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