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Adobe Releases Flash Tools as Open Source



Adobe has announced two new Adobe Flash Platform open source initiatives for developers. The Open Source Media Framework (OSMF), part of the project previously code named Strobe, lets developers build media players optimized for the Adobe Flash Platform. The Text Layout Framework (TLF) will help developers bring sophisticated typography capabilities to Web applications. Both OSMF and TLF are freely available as open source software, helping content owners extend their online media efforts as they look to create new business opportunities and monetization strategies for publishing on the Web.

"Adobe is committed to providing core Flash Platform technologies to the community as open source," said Dave McAllister, director of standards and open source at Adobe. "By releasing OSMF and TLF as open source, we are helping facilitate the creation and sharing of best practices for media players and rich text-based Web application development."

OSMF provides standard functionality along with plug-ins from third parties so content providers have the flexibility to adapt monetization strategies to specific content and the needs of their audiences. OSMF includes an API for partners to build plug-ins for value-add services. OSMF source code and pluggable software components are available immediately under the Mozilla Public License and available at www.OpenSourceMediaFramework.com.

The Text Layout Framework (TLF) provides support for complex languages, bidirectional text, multi-columns and other advanced typographical features and controls. TLF is an extensible ActionScript library built on top of the text engine in Adobe Flash Player 10 and Adobe AIR 1.5 software. Source code and component library for TLF are available as open source at no charge under the Mozilla Public License at opensource.adobe.com/wiki/display/tlf/.


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