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Developers Must Wake Up To Responsive UIs


Telerik's Kendo HTML5 and JavaScript UI framework has been updated with intelligent UI widgets to create what the company is calling "responsive design elements" for cross-platform and mobile applications. (Responsive design is a client-side technique for supporting multiple design layouts.)

For developers, responsive design is billed as something to think about when programming cross-platform to accommodate the many sizes and scopes of devices, screen sizes, and other differentiating factors.

Gartner noted recently, "Many enterprises view [responsive design] RD as the answer to lowering development costs and time to deploy. To date, most implementations of RD are either hand-coded or use one of dozens of small, open-source libraries or frameworks."

Telerik says developers can now easily build applications with intelligent UI widgets that automatically adapt to different screen sizes and form factors. The Q3 2013 release also marks the industry's first commercially available responsive Grid and Scheduler widgets.

Developers using Kendo UI now get out-of-the-box apps, which adapt to the mobile devices their end users are using, without any additional coding. They also get a powerful API to specify responsive behavior for widgets, giving them the granular control they desire.

No More Lowest-Common-Denominator Browser

"Building websites and apps just doesn't mean what it used to. Even a few short years ago, building for the Web was an exercise in targeting the lowest-common-denominator browser. With the proliferation of smartphones, tablets, and other Internet-connected screens, responsive design has emerged as a powerful solution to deal with this complexity by enabling developers to build with flexibility," said Telerik's Todd Anglin.

"With the addition of things like auto-adapting widgets, Telerik continues deliver, in Kendo UI, a framework that has everything developers need to build cross-platform and mobile applications. No JavaScript framework in the market today — commercial or open source — is evolving as quickly or delivering as much value as Kendo UI."


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