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Jaxcent,"AJAX in Java" for the Internet Released


Desiderata Software has released Jaxcent 2, a freely available Java API for accessing and modifying Document Object Model (DOM) of browsers.

Version 2 is an unrestricted Java API for doing full-fledged AJAX operations. It can be run on the open Internet instead of being restricted to intranets. The Java of Jaxcent now runs on the server side, and still gives Java programmers full control over the client's DOM hierarchy. On the client side, all that is required is to add a single JavaScript include statement to existing HTML content, then the resulting page can communicate with Jaxcent on the server.

On the server side, Jaxcent works with standard Java servlet containers and provides classes that correspond to elements of the Document Object Model (DOM), and that can be instantiated to match HTML elements existing (or dynamically created) on the page. These classes provide methods for interacting with the HTML elements, and for receiving events originating from the HTML elements, all in Java. In addition to dynamic interactions with the HTML elements, Jaxcent also provides access to the session and application context, as well as entirely automatic session data management.

You don't need to rewrite existing applications to take advantage of Jaxcent. Using Jaxcent, as needed, one or more AJAX features can be added piecemeal to one or more pages without any need to modify the structure or specifics of the overall application.

Jaxcent works with AJAX capable browsers, such as Internet Explorer 6, Internet Explorer 7, and Firefox. Jaxcent is written entirely in Java and JavaScript, and therefore is operating system independent. Jaxcent programmers do not need to work in JavaScript. Jaxcent will work with any existing JavaScript code, and it provides features to take advantage of JavaScript if desired, but primarily Jaxcent programming is all-Java and no-JavaScript programming.

Jaxcent Version 2 is available for free downloads at www.jaxcent.com.

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