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700 New Functions In Wolfram Mathematica 10


Wolfram has released Mathematica 10. This computational software program is used across a number of scientific, engineering, mathematical, and computing fields. Based on symbolic mathematics, Mathematica 10 has over 700 new functions — the single biggest jump in new functionality in the software's history.

Mathematica 10 is the first version of Mathematica based on the complete Wolfram Language. Also important here is the fact that integration with the Wolfram Cloud and access to the expanded Wolfram Knowledgebase may open up new possibilities for intelligent computation and deployment.

Mathematica 10 introduces machine learning, computational geometry, geographic computation, and device connectivity — as well as deepening capabilities and coverage across the algorithmic spectrum.

"At a personal level, it is very satisfying to see after all these years how successful the principles that I defined at the very beginning of the Mathematica project have proven to be. And it is also satisfying to see how far we've gotten with all the talent and hard work that has been poured into Mathematica over nearly three decades," wrote Stephen Wolfram in his launch-day blog post.

Wolfram advises that if you're an existing Mathematica user, you’ll notice some changes when you start using notebooks in Mathematica 10. This is because there's now autocompletion everywhere — for option values, strings, wherever.

"There's also a hovering help box that lets you immediately get function templates or documentation. And there's also — as much requested by the user community — computation-aware multiple undo. It's horribly difficult to know how and when you can validly undo Mathematica computations — but in Mathematica 10 we've finally managed to solve this to the point of having a practical multiple undo," he said.

Another significant change in Mathematica 10 is that plots and graphics have a fresh new default look as shown below.


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