Channels ▼

Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz

Dr. Dobb's Bloggers

Google Chrome -The browser is the new Desktop

August 31, 2008

I've written a lot on the efforts in converging web and desktop applications (Adobe Air, Mozila Prism, Silverlight, JavaFX, Google Gears etc.). Now Google ups the ante with the (soon to be official) introduction of its new webkit based browser - dubbed Chrome (You can see a comics explanation of its main concepts/features).

Let's do a quick recap before taking more about Chrome. Basically we see all the major players trying to blur the lines between desktop applications and web applications (a.k.a. Rich Internet Applications) some players are on the offensive (Adobe, Google) and some on the defensive (Microsoft, Sun) but the direction is identical. The web oriented companies understood that RIAs are becoming more real application and not "just" web pages. They also understand they need presence on the desktop for easier accessibility and better acceptance by users as a "serious" applications. Furthermore, the fact the applications become more serious and more mission critical, along with the fact that they can (and are) be used on-the-go where disconnects occur, the need for occasionally connecteness becomes more apparent. This is where smart-clients have a lead and technologies like Gears are trying to catch-up.

Now,in my opinion, Google makes a bold move to change the rules and re-define the playground - if webapss need to run on the desktop, let's make the browser the new desktop.
What makes me say that? because it is focused on application (see the comics),because the browser runs each tab in its own process, because it has a process monitor, because it is a link on the google home page...

From the chrome "OS" point of view we can look at javascript,HTML etc. as the IL (bytecode in java speak) on which the application run. This makes cross-compilers like GWT and the good side of MS Volta (vs. the bad side) the next abstraction layer. I expect these will be more significant in the future

Anyway, you can see for yourself if you download it now from  www.google.com/chrome

Related Reading


More Insights






Currently we allow the following HTML tags in comments:

Single tags

These tags can be used alone and don't need an ending tag.

<br> Defines a single line break

<hr> Defines a horizontal line

Matching tags

These require an ending tag - e.g. <i>italic text</i>

<a> Defines an anchor

<b> Defines bold text

<big> Defines big text

<blockquote> Defines a long quotation

<caption> Defines a table caption

<cite> Defines a citation

<code> Defines computer code text

<em> Defines emphasized text

<fieldset> Defines a border around elements in a form

<h1> This is heading 1

<h2> This is heading 2

<h3> This is heading 3

<h4> This is heading 4

<h5> This is heading 5

<h6> This is heading 6

<i> Defines italic text

<p> Defines a paragraph

<pre> Defines preformatted text

<q> Defines a short quotation

<samp> Defines sample computer code text

<small> Defines small text

<span> Defines a section in a document

<s> Defines strikethrough text

<strike> Defines strikethrough text

<strong> Defines strong text

<sub> Defines subscripted text

<sup> Defines superscripted text

<u> Defines underlined text

Dr. Dobb's encourages readers to engage in spirited, healthy debate, including taking us to task. However, Dr. Dobb's moderates all comments posted to our site, and reserves the right to modify or remove any content that it determines to be derogatory, offensive, inflammatory, vulgar, irrelevant/off-topic, racist or obvious marketing or spam. Dr. Dobb's further reserves the right to disable the profile of any commenter participating in said activities.

 
Disqus Tips To upload an avatar photo, first complete your Disqus profile. | View the list of supported HTML tags you can use to style comments. | Please read our commenting policy.
 


Video