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Microsoft Unveils Next Version of Visual Studio and .NET Framework



Microsoft has provided the first look at the next version of its developer tools and platform, which will be named Visual Studio 2010 and the .NET Framework 4.0. This includes an in-depth look at how Visual Studio Team System (VSTS) 2010 (code-named "Rosario") will help "democratize" ALM with a unique solution that brings all the members of a development organization into the application development lifecycle, and removes many of the existing barriers to integration.

"With Visual Studio 2010 and the .NET Framework 4.0, we are focused on the core pillars of developer experience, support for the latest platforms spanning client, server, services and devices, targeted experiences for specific application types, and core architecture improvements," said S. "Soma" Somasegar, senior vice president of the Developer Division at Microsoft. "These pillars are designed specifically to meet the needs of developers, the teams that drive the application lifecycle from idea to delivery, and the customers that demand the highest quality applications across multiple platforms. You can expect to hear a lot more about Visual Studio 2010 and the .NET Framework 4.0 in the coming months."

Here's what Microsoft means by "democratizing" ALM: Much of application development remains siloed throughout the enterprise, leading to decreased productivity and lengthy product development cycles. With VSTS 2010, Microsoft is giving individuals and development organizations an solution that lets them integrate and build and deliver applications. This includes new capabilities that make it easier for all contributors on the software team to participate throughout the lifecycle -- from the core developers and testers to the wider team of project managers, designers, and business analysts. Highlights include:

  • Modeling tools. With VSTS 2010 Architecture, Microsoft will enable both technical and nontechnical users to create and use models to collaborate and to define business and system functionality graphically. The new version supports both Unified Modeling Language and Domain Specific Language support, so development organizations will have the right tool for right job. The new modeling capabilities in VSTS 2010 are a core part of the larger Microsoft modeling platform, which will also include the "Oslo" repository, tools and language.
  • Improved efficiency throughout the test cycle. With VSTS 2010, Microsoft has made a significant investment in testing features and dramatically simplifying the tools required to integrate testing across the life cycle. New features include the ability to eliminate nonreproducible bugs, fast setup and deployment of tests to ensure the highest degree of completeness of test, focused test planning and progress tracking, and ensuring that all code changes are properly tested.
  • Improvements in collaboration capabilities. Microsoft has made major investments in the capabilities and scalability of Team Foundation Server (TFS) including significant improvements that allow teams to configure and adopt any flavor of Agile development processes. Teams can track and trace work more easily with richer linking of work items enabling hierarchical work item relationships. In the source code management system, TFS now provides visualization tools for tracking changes across branches and into the production build. VSTS 2010 also introduces workflow-based builds that catch errors before they have a chance to affect the rest of the team or, worse, enter production. Finally, administrators will find dramatically simpler TFS deployment and management.

In another move to increase integration across the lifecycle, Microsoft also announced that VSTS 2010 will provide a unified VSTS Development and Database product. As a benefit to existing Software Assurance (SA) customers, those who currently own Visual Studio Team System 2008 Development Edition or Visual Studio Team System 2008 Database Edition will receive all the following products starting Oct. 1, 2008, for free:

  • Visual Studio Team System 2008 Development Edition
  • Visual Studio Team System 2008 Database Edition
  • Visual Studio 2005 Team System for Software Developers
  • Visual Studio 2005 Team System for Database Professionals


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