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Building The Continuous Delivery Single Truth Repository


Perforce has integrated its Perforce Commons document collaboration platform used extensively in software application development with the Dropbox file-sharing tool.

Heavily focused on the virtues of Agile and Continuous Development, Perforce users employing Commons to store and manage the versions of their project documents can now upload files directly into Dropbox, which syncs content across all the devices associated with a customer account.

Combining the two technologies allows users to share files via Dropbox while utilizing Commons' robust collaboration and version-control capabilities.

Commons is built upon a versioning engine to extend Perforce version management to what are often less technical staff who will work with programmers in the total scheme of a given project. Documents and other files can now exist in the same shared repository that developers use for code and artists use for graphics.

This is all about giving software development projects one place for the so-called "single source of truth" for all assets — and this, so says Perforce, is a "fundamental requirement" for the emerging software development methodology of Continuous Delivery.

All Perforce products are free for up to 20 users including access to Perforce's technical support. Perforce Commons is available as both an on-premise solution and a cloud service.

"It's becoming rare for document reviews and revisions to take place exclusively at desktops connected to a server. Thanks to advanced file-sharing tools like Dropbox, users propagate their evolving documents to any number of devices and share them with their peers," said Christopher Seiwald, founder and CEO of Perforce. "That's why our integration with Dropbox is so helpful. Now our customers can easily share files across their devices while still reaping in the benefits of our enterprise version management."


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