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Don't Suppose You've Heard of Aspose?


There are updates aplenty this month from Aspose, a vendor of .NET, Java, cloud, and Android APIs. The firm is also focused on SharePoint components and rendering extensions for Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services and JasperReports.

Aspose says its core remit is to offer a set of file-management APIs and supports some of the most popular file formats including: Microsoft Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, PowerPoint presentations, Outlook emails and archives, Visio diagrams, Project files, OneNote documents, and Adobe Acrobat PDF documents.

New news is that all "Aspose for Cloud" (that's a product name) products are now in the firm's Python SDK. Aspose maintains a number of SDKs for Aspose for Cloud and most recently it has added Tasks to the Python SDK to ensure that Python developers have access to all Aspose for Cloud APIs when developing applications.

Back to the core product, Aspose for Cloud is a cloud-based document generation, conversion, and automation platform for developers.

According to the company itself, "Before Aspose for Cloud APIs, document processing, and manipulation tasks were not so easy. Aspose for Cloud APIs give developers full control over documents and file formats. Each API has been developed to offer you a wide range of features for file processing in cloud."

Aspose for Cloud REST APIs are platform independent and can be utilized across any platform such as Amazon and Salesforce without any installation. Being language independent makes it a choice for the developers with expertise in any programming language. The firm also provides SDKs in different programming languages such as .NET, Java, PHP, Ruby, Node.js, and Python.

Aspose.Tasks for Cloud is a project management API for developers to provide Microsoft Project document manipulation capability in their applications — without using Microsoft Project. Developers can control various stages of project management. API provides full control over a project's tasks, task links, resources, resource assignments, and extended attribute data.


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